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margin cars made in the u.s.a. outpaced imports in terms of quality. but have the car companys' images improved? us automakers finally listened. consumers seem to be shifting their views about buying american. "cadillacs are awesome. i mean my next car is a cadillac. reporter: and you are driving what right now? a lexus. this is a great car for as long as i have had it don't get me wrong, but cadillac is putting out a great car right now. and, yeah, i will go back to buying american." "we now have people thinking i want to buy american." david koehler, marketing professor at the university of illinois at chicago believes american automakers are doing a better job of keying in on what consumers want. "i think that as for becoming more fuel efficient, environmentally friendly, it's becoming better." "would you buy an american car? do you think the quality is getting better? i do, i do feel like the quality is getting better. especially now that taxpayers bailed them out. they were forced to." koehler agrees bailout money sparked u.s. automakers to improve quality. ford did not take the
at the u.s. justice department from 2000-2006. currently senior director for mississippi river and east coast center for rivers and deltas, part of the environmental defense fund, senior direct there are. and as we look at restoration, mr. harrison, what's the prescription from your area? if you don't quite know how bad it is yet, how are you going to get your head around how to restore things? what's your process going to be? guest: well, one of the things that people need to remember about the louisiana wetlands in particular and the gulf of mexico is that these are places where environmental damage has been happening for the past 80, 100 years. you can take the louisiana wetlands, for example, because we made some decisions on how we manage the mississippi river, the wetlands are actually the delta of the mississippi river. this is where the river comes down, it's draining 41% of the united states, it's eroding all that land and sediment. and it buills this land mass, where new orleans sits. it's where the fishing communities are. and it's an ongoing battle between the gulf of mexico
will be very narrow and it's not even clear if it will pass. >> u.s. timid point out many industries and economies want an economy-wide cap and trade system so they know there are certainties about the system. does that mean that under current law that the epa could step in and say we're going to regulate transportation? >> that is exactly what is happening already. the epa is moving to regulate greenhouse gas emissions. they just announced and finalize regulations covering greenhouse gas emissions from automobiles. they have announced plans to go forward with regulations that would cover power plants. other industries. they're moving that direction. those regulations are likely to be more costly because the epa is not the expert on which technology is the best, they're just going to say you have to meet this emissions reduction and it will be much more expensive. >> could you want our viewers through what an energy-only bill looks like if they can't even do -- which it sells like it will be able to do -- cap and trade on utilities, if they can't do that, what does an energy-only bil
. president obama led a chorus of concern over the huge disclosure of classified u.s. military documents about the war in afghanistan. >> ifill: and i'm gwen ifill. on the newshour tonight, two takes on the document dump. first, senators jack reed and kit bond assess what it could mean for the war effort. >> lehrer: then, judy woodruff talks to david leigh of the "guardian" and media watcher alex jones on the journalism impact. >> ifill: holly pattenden of "business monitor international" in london looks at the corporate shake-up at b.p. >> lehrer: tom bearden reports from the alabama gulf coast on kenneth feinberg and the complicated mission of compensation. >> and the lead is still tied up they still compensation hasn't been forth coming. >> when i was a young person working in these places, didn't see a way out. and i certainly didn't think the way out would be this. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's newshour. major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: and with the ongoing support of these institutions and foundations. and... this program was made possible by the corpor
in the u.s. >> say that again. that surprised me. more students -- >> in numbers we have about the same number of people getting degrees in computer science in the u.s. >> is that because you're playing catchup with the u.s.? >> that's right. we're focusing how technology is going to be really do well. it's very important and we're focusing on that. we recently built competitive but the focus is how we jump into knowledge based economy based in technology and technology means any things. not just software. >> do you use israel as a model of how you want to do this? there are companies based in silicon valley that have operations in israel and a couple weeks ago i went to an israel conference where there was a huge presence from google and oracle. >> israel has small country. mexico has tremendous opportunity. we have a fantastic condition and that's one of the things we're seeking. how we learn venture capitals to make an interview to michael cassidy and how we replicate that. we shop companies that are getting into that business and we pursue how we create that. >> how do you appeal to
for the u.s. the whole exchange happened on an airport tarmac in vienna, austr austria. one plane headed east and the other headed west. matthew chance is in moscow with the latest. >> reporter: that's right. the biggest spy swap since the end of the cold war has taken place on the tarmac of the airports in the austrian capital of view any. the plane carrying the ten confessed spies from the united states, confessed to working for russia. landed at the airport a short time ago. couple of hours ago now. it was followed quickly afterwards by an official aircraft from russia which was carrying four people pardoned by russian serving the lengthy prison sentences in russian jails for spying for western powers, including the united states. the exchange took place on the tarmac which men none of the -- people actually entered the country of austria. the one plane carrying the four from russia has taken off and landed, we understand, now from the united kingdom. the other aircraft carrying the ten russians arraigned in new york is still on its way back to the russian capital. >> this was all par
more u.s. soldiers were killed in afghanistan in the last 24 hours, bringing the total to 66 for july-- the most in a single month since the war began. >> woodruff: and i'm judy woodruff. on the "newshour" tonight, ray suarez talks to two veterans of the iraq and afghanistan conflicts about the continued challenge from deadly roadside bombs or i.e.d.s-- the number one killer of americans. >> lehrer: we explore the latest mix of economic numbers and the prospects for the auto industry with business reporter micki maynard and economist martin bailey. >> woodruff: david brooks and ruth marcus, sitting in for mark shields, present their analysis of the week's news. ♪ >> lehrer: and sting with strings. jeffrey brown talks to rock star sting about his newest musical challenge-- performing with a 45 piece orchestra. >> the royal if i ma mar:-- philharmonic is a serious orchestra. so in a way it does flatter my ego but also i have to step up to the plate and... and you know, so it's a big challenge for me. >> lehrer: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." major funding for the pbs newsho
of a vacuum after this country's inconclusive march elections. the u.s. would like to see a government seated before that drawdown completes itself by the end of august. the u.s., of course, as we remember, drawing down to 50,000 troops. that is not a critical factor. i have been hearing repeatedly from the u.s. military, from senior administration officials, that unless something catastrophic takes place, that drawdown will stay on course. what we are seeing in iraq these days aside from the political bickering that is taking place is that drawdown happening in the complete and total intensity. it is overwhelming when you look at it. we are talking about the u.s. moving millions of pieces of equipment, hundreds of bases shutting down across the country. all of this very critical, being closely watched by rocky officials. there are wide sfrspread concer amongst the population. >> what we are seeing on dr. biden, she is not just there to shake hands and stand by her husband's side. she has a schedule of her own while she is there? >> that's right, she does. we are hearing that she is also goin
. host: the debate over u.s. strategy in afghanistan is back on the front page this morning, following the leak of those wikileak documents -- one legislator says these documents call into question several things, and an investigation is likely to follow. meanwhile, slated to vote on $37 billion in emergency supplemental money for the war. the leak could complement that. we want your thoughts this morning on the leak. here are the lines. we will get to those phone calls in just a minute. on the house but, that $37 billion supplemental amount, senator dennis whose image is circulating a letter asking congressional members to vote against the supplemental funding. "the washington post" this morning says that official leaks will not alter views. they know that republicans have been largely silent. perhaps because the bulk of documents concerned the war effort during the george w. bush administration. lawmakers said the trove of documents may harden opposition, but is unlikely to suddenly alter impressions of a war the administration had previously acknowledged is tough amid declining publ
, of the ford motor company. in an average week in the u.s., thousands of babies are born prematurely and develop lifelong health problems or disabilities. that is why thousands of families and business leaders will once again join together to support the march of dimes in our nation's oldest walk fundraiser, the march for babies. i am proud to be one of the national co-chairs for the 2010 march for babies. together with the u.a.w., we are committed to raising awareness and funding from volunteers like you. your funds support research and community programs to ensure that someday, all babies will be born healthier and lead happier lives. volunteers enabled the march of dimes to conquer polio. we are confident that, with your help, we can walk together toward a healthier future for our nation's babies and have fun. please join us. register today at marchforbabies.org. >>> afghan anxiety. the desperate search for missing sailors and a huge leak of classified information from the battle front. >>> then, chief change. bp's top executive, tony hey ward, heads out while the replacement move
right. mike viqueira on the white house lawn, thanks very much. >>> new reports of just how much the u.s. paid that iranian scientist for secrets of iran's nuclear program. jim miklaszewski joins us from the pentagon. mick, the numbers are staggering. the cia paid $5 million and one report said offered him $50 million to not return to iran. do we know how true the report is? >> reporter: the claim from the iranian nuclear scientist himself and no basis to that fact but u.s. officials confirm that the cia paid this nuclear scientist $5 million after the scientist defected to the united states but he's now returning to teheran. good news here according to u.s. officials is this person cannot get the hands on that money. he returned to teheran overnight a hero's welcome and reunion with his wife and son who may have been in danger back there in iran but the money is in frozen accounts controlled by the u.s. government for the time being. one of the big questions here, chuck, is once sanctions if they're ever lifted on iran would he then have the ability to get at that $5 million? but there'
between the westboro baptist church and the family of a maryland marine moves one step closer to the u.s. supreme court. the church filed a brief this week, saying its actions are protected by the first amendment. >> reporter: the westborough baptist church filed this 75- page brief. attorney margie phelps will argue the case in front of the supreme court. she defended the church members' protest outside of matthew schneider's funeral in 2006. >> it is everybody's first amendment right to go to a public plot and speak on public issues. who in the world is not talking about the dying soldier? >> reporter: the kansas state believes the u.s. military deaths are god's punishment for tolerance of homosexuality. in the argument, phelps argues its actions are protected by the first amendment. not so says the father of the fallen marine. al schneider talks about the upcoming case. my son and hundreds of thousands of other men and women have died to protect freedom of speech. and to have a group of 80 people degraded and mock it is disgusting. >> in a separate legal brief filed with the court, 48
an easy relationship with the u.s., but clinton went out of her way to show hamid karzai respect. even as she embraced the afghan government's effort to step up and take control of the country, clinton reminded delegates that there's still much work to be done. >> we have no intention of abandoning our long term mission of achieving the kind of afghanistan that president karzai set forth in his speech. >> reporter: afghan president hamid karzai said his government was ready to take more control of the war against insurgents and also the billions of dollars of foreign aid flowing in to afghanistan. but with greater control comes greater responsibility. afghanistan is one of the most corrupt countries in the world and delegates from more than 60 different countries are demanding the afghan government cleans up its act. the secretary of state was delivering a delicately balanced message. on one hand promising the u.s. has a long term commitment to the afghan cause. on the other, reminding everyone that president obama would like to see u.s. troop numbers here start to fall in a year's tim
: good morning, vinita. we're expected to receive information on the ten detained in the u.s. on spying allegations. the trade-off is reported to be four others imprisoned in russia. a nuclear weapon scientists who was detained in 2004. all accused of spying for the u.s. all ten suspects were moved to new york, reportedly in anticipation of a release. this mother and brother told abc news in moscow, said he had been given an offer he could not refuse. and was sent to england regardless. the deal was cut after a series of meetings at the russian ambassador's residence between the ambassador and the u.s. diplomat. >> did the spy case come up? likely, it did. am i going to get into details? no. >> reporter: what of those arrested who were not naturalized russians. the relatives of one of the detainees, peruvian born vicky pelaez. but the judge recommended she wait in custody. her lawyer says that pelaez wants to appear in court and has absolutely no interest in going to russia. >> as far as i know, she would absolutely have no desire to go to russia. >> reporter: also what is to be worked
to step aside. several vitamin at groups have asked the u.s. district judge martin feldman to are with draw due to a number of investments he's made in oil and gas companies but he's refused. he said, quote, the motion for discall fi indication is without merit. >>> bp's issue is on top at the white house today. amid-american backlash against the british oil giant, the two are going to address whether they had influence of the lockerbie bomber from a scottish prison. before leaving for the u.s. cameron called the decision, quote, utterly wrong. u.s. lawmakers want to know whether there's a link between the freeing of a bomber, a libyan, and a bp oil deal with libya. >>> senate democrats are expected to push through a long delay bill, skpenlding unemployment benefits for 2 1/2 million americans today. the legislation had been stalled for weeks with democrats short a crucial 60th vote. but all that changes today with the swearing in of carte goodwin, the new democratic senator. his decision puts democrats in position to overcome a republican filibuster and bring the bill to a
for probably four people who were convicted in russia of spying for the u.s. four people considered high value by the u.s. that we want to get back. one unresolved question here is what happens to the minor children of these ten and i just don't know what the answer to that will be, whether they'll stay here or whether they'll go back with their parents. i don't believe that when their parents get to russia they will be under any obligation to serve any time in incarceration, it may be that the judge will simply sentence them to time served which will be what, 11 days and they will be free to leave russia. once they agree to plead guilty, it's not really they choice. >> people are very curious for a number of reasons about this, the intrigue and so on and so forth, but can you at least tell us who would be behind the rapid speed of this transfer? is it the white house? who's pushing for this to happen to quickly? >> well, i think you can say very high level in both the russia and the u.s. governments. while this is following all the rules in the justice department, in the federal courts it's m
ago that six u.s. service members have been killed in attacks today in afghanistan. our atia abawi is with us again from kabul. we heard the number six had been killed but most of these were separate incidents. >> reporter: good morning, t.j. absolutely right. another grim day here in afghanistan. six different incidents in different parts of the country proving that the fighting is widespread in this vast land. two u.s. service members were killed in southern afghanistan in separate ied strikes. that's roadside mines. one was also killed in eastern afghanistan by the same tactic. three others were also killed in eastern afghanistan, small arms fire, insurgent attack, as well as an accidental explosion. today, proof that the summer is intense here in afghanistan. the fighting will continue. this is a month after, just a couple of weeks after the deadliest month here in afghanistan since the war began enter 2001. 101 nato service members killed. that's the deadliest that this war has seen. many do expect that july and august may be worse. t.j.? >> it may be worse. like you mentioned
voters they support stronger immigration policy. >> meanwhile, baltimore is now home to a new group of u.s. citizens. rob roblin was there as they took the oath to become proud americans. >> for 72 people from all over the world, this is a day they will never forget. >> i'm happy! >> it was an emotional day for the immigrants who became u.s. citizens today. family and friends gathered at the war memorial building for the swearing in of our new citizens. snl the 72 people that became new citizens today came from over 40 countries from all over the country. stephanie rawlings-blake welcomed the new citizens. >> the passion we call america. >> for those that became citizens today, it was a dream come tru. >> i start to live in a free country. to do quha i like to do in this great -- to do what i like to do in this great law. >> it may be possible for me to achieve this beautiful country today. i am glad i am a zens of the united states of america. >> it was a day our new citizens will never forget. for many, it was a very emotional day. rob roblin, wbal-tv 11 news. >> cape cod beaches closed
is convicted. both suspects are due in court next week. >>> >>> the u.s. economy had the weakest growth in almost a year. the commerce department said the gross domestic product grew 2.4% in april, may and june. that is down from 3.7% revised number. weaker consumer spending and less growth from companies rebuilding inventories are seen as the main factor for the drop in growth. >>> the transit labor dispute is heading to court today. the judge may decide whether or not to overturn a contract that was imposed on transit employees. the contract changed work rules and shifted hours. that angered a lot of bus drivers who have been accused of staging a sickout. they say they need concessions from the union to reduce the budget deficit. they say if the judge reinstates the old contracts, all weekend transit service could be eliminated. >>> all right. time is 7:08. >>> yesterday we had call train delays. do we have them today. >> we do furtherly. we have a train that's been cancelled. i'm looking at the e-mail sent from cal train. let me pull this up here. it is train 309. it has been cancell
for u.s. troops in the afghan war. names and faces for the victims. >> i'm drew griffin in for tony harris. those stories and your comments right here right now in the cnn newsroom. >>> let's start with the economy. the government's latest report on the health of the u.s. economy is out, and while there are signs the economy is growing, it's happening very slowly. what does that mean for one of ten americans out of work? carter evans on the floor of the new york stock exchange with the breakdown. it looks like the economy is growing at an an peoplic rate. >> the economy is growing at 2.4%, the gross domestic product, the broadest measure of economic activity in our country what does this report mean for the people looking for a job right now? it means more uncertainty and the problem with that is when things are uncertain, employers aren't hiring. let's focus on growth. our gdp -- this short shows you the growth. we have been growing. that is good news. just the pace, drew, is not as fast as we would like to see. >> and, carter, the growth rate is heading in the wrong direction with
>> president obama will be at the white house today. he will pend time with u.s. troops and their families. vice president joe biden's second day of the trip to iraq. one headline says this is seen as a move to end the political deadlock there. also, today general david patraeus officially took command of the mission in afghanistan. a quote from him in this important endeavor teamwork is not an option. this is a tough mission. there is nothing easy about it said the general. on this independence day we have the question for you to open the program. is america exceptional? we have that from one writer from the new yo"new york daily who says it is time to rescue the idea that america is exceptional. what do you think? [phone numbers on the line] host: we have this piece on this fourth of july titled "bring back the old glory." he says the notion of american exceptionalism that it is a unique nation on earth if not in all history is in decline among much of the country's self-appointed chattering classes. they write the lion's share of books, magazines, editorials and blogs
endorse it. >>> to our top story. the u.s. military says hundreds of american troops are searching for two navy sailors who disappeared in a taliban stronghold in eastern afghanistan on friday. yesterday, the taliban claimed they killed one of the sailors and took the other one as a prisoner, after both were forced from their armored sport utility vehicle. however, nato officials have not confirmed the reports and still characterize the men as missing. there are also conflicting reports about whether the body of one of the two has been recovered. the war in afghanistan also getting attention this morning by the release of the more than 90,000 classified field reports i mentioned. they were made public by an organization that says its goal in disclosing secret documents is to reveal unethical behavior by governments and corporations now, the documents span from january of 2004 -- from 2004 to january of this year, and paint a bleak picture of the situation on the ground there. according to "the new york times" one of the news organizations that was granted early access to the reports, they
rpassed vietnam as the longest military campaign in u.s. history. republican richard lugar demands more clarity about the administration's direction. also tributes were being paid to three british soldiers who also lost their lives in violent attacks, kill the by a rogue afghan soldier who has since gone on the run. >> they've got to reassure us they're doing everything they can to minimize it happening again. but for those who it has happened to in that patrol base, this will have been a horrific event. >> as the british casualties also continue to climb, it is becoming increasingly difficult to defend the british presence in afghanistan. also, this morning afghan president hamid karzai endorsed a u.s. plan to set up local police forces to help afghan villagers protect themselves. >> thanks to sonia gallego in london. >>> officers from north korea and the american-led united nations force that helps protect south korea came face to face this morning. on the agenda was the sinking of that south korean navy ship back in march. 46 south korean sailors were killed in that incident. th
information about u.s. business, scientific and political affairs to pass on to the russian government. many of them make court appearances today. >>> attention, parents of children who received free jewelry trinkets from a number of clinics the last five years. it may be tainted with toxic metal called cadmium. the government announced a recall of 70,000 of the so-called children's happy charm bracelets and rings distributed by doctors and dentists since 2005. it is the fourth recall this year of chinese-made jewelry. >>> here's an airline travel nightmare we haven't heard of before. a us airways flight from atlanta to charlotte was forced to return to the gate after maggots fell from the overhead bin onto seated passengers. they came from a container of spoiled meat that had been stowed by a passenger. the airline cleaned the plane and then the flight continued. the person who carried on the meat took a later flight. i'm sure was heckled by everybody else on board that plane. can you imagine? >> no, can we get away from this video? i don't want to imagine. >> as if snakes on a plane wasn't
of a spy novel itself. and it seemed like the priority here was u.s./russia relations. the question outstanding is what kind of threat does russia pose with its espionage against the united states? >> let's step back for a second and understand that i think this is a great credit to our law enforcement. we made arrests, law enforcement community made arrests. these individuals have been monitored for quite some time. they tried but they never got classified information and intelligence. and now they've left the country, which again is a big win for our law enforcement community. i set that aside. i think our relationship with russia is no doubt improving if you look at where it was just a few years ago. the economic discussions that president medvedev and president obama made recently in reducing nuclear weapons and hopefully we'll get a treaty through senate this summer that will further reduce nuclear weapons means our security is stronger and safer and our relationship is stronger. >> more broadly on foreign policy. i can remember back two years ago as you can july of 2008 the pr
depends on how you see the world. . >> reporter: at the u.s. geological survey in menlo park, a lecture four decades in the making with one lesson. >> it's a beautiful planet but it needs care. >> reporter: the usgs is sharing 38 years' worth of satellite photos from around the world, comparing for better or for worse how things have changed. this is shanghai in 1973, mostly forest and farmland. here it is in 2005, the cities colored in blue have exploded in population. here's a patch of rain forest in brazil back in 1975. here's that same 80-mile stretch 28 years later mostly farmland. to outsiders all this development is alarming. >> you could say it's alarming or you could say it's a wonderful thing if you are a farmer in that area and suddenly you have 20,000 hectars of wheat that you can plant and cattle. >> reporter: this is the gulf oil spill in may the white portion oil. the same view taken wednesday, the oil sheen spread dramatically. remember the devastating floods in north dakota last year? this is what fargo normally looks like. and here's fargo last year. the black area is
,000 for the chevy volt and for the nissan. we will get your calls in a moment. this from "the new york times," "u.s. military chief is pressing the iraqis to end the deadlock to the rest in securities gains. nearly five months after the elections in march ended without a decisive leader, the leaders of political blocs are divided over staying in power for a second term. many politicians say that the impasse could extend after more than seven years of war, reducing the number of troops to more than 50,000 by the end of august. " another energy related story this morning, "on the surface the oil spill in the gulf is vanishing fast." it says "the oil slick in the gulf of mexico appears to be dissolving far more rapidly than anyone expected. a piece of good news that raises tricky new questions about how best bet big government should scaled-back its response." also this morning on the front page of "usa today," "closures in three areas, almost all of the beaches closed from the spill have been clustered in three areas of louisiana. this is the 20th annual report conducted by the national research defe
. 's he has said he supports the president's plan to begin with drawing u.s. troops by next july based on conditions on the ground. >>> today, where possible, u.s. forces tried to do what americans all across the country spent the day doing, celebrating our independence. somehow, it means more in a country struggling for freedom. general with tray us led a celebration. for the u.s. troops, it was a taste of home. u.s. ambassador karl i can enberg berry took part of the celebration. joe biden spent the fourth of july in iraq. he met with leaders still in political deadlocked merely four months after national elections. vice president and his wife had a holiday lunch with u.s. troops. it was his second straight visit to iraq on the fourth of july. >>> to the gulf coast now, which is usually packed with tourists on the fourth of july. not the case this year, though. the oil disaster is keeping many visitors and their money away from those shores. our join zarrella is down in gulf shores, alabama right now. john, good to see you. at least there's plenty of room to lay out your beach towel.
promes appropriations and confirmation hearings to get them to enforce u.s. code. >> next question directed toward john mccain. allen greenspan said there is reason not to extend the bush tax cut, but favor them, even as we face the growing seff sit. >> i respect allen greenspan but he was in charge when this meltdown occurred and obviously has great responsibility for it. we can't raise taxes at this time. tax increases will hurt our economy even more. whether i voted against the bush tax cuts in 2001 because i predicted that spending had to be brought under control, and it was not. we worked from tax cuts and benefits. i voted for tax cuts, but i didn't want to go from spluss to deficit. with you -- but we are in tage. but we are in danger. we are in danger of, at best, a very slow recovery. people are hurting. we need to have our taxes kept low. we need to cut corporate taxes, and we need to give social security tax and other payroll taxes -- taxes need to be held off until we can get the e-mail businesses back in business -- get the small business yes -- businesses back in busi
copia county. >>> a milestone in the afghan war. july now the deadliest month in the war for u.s. troops. more people are asking, is this fight worth the cost? >>> and we are coming back. that is president obama's message for the auto industry. we're tracking his trip aimed at boosting the big three. >>> but first, you have got to see this. this is one congressman saying he's not taking it anymore. here is what he said. anthony weiner, congressman of new york said today, maybe the brooklyn in me came out. he's referring to what happened last night on the flash of the house of representatives after a bill that he co sponsored didn't make it for procedural reasons. listen to him in his own words. >> the gentleman from new york is recognized. >> mr. speaker, i yield one minute to the distinguished gentleman from new york, mr. weiner. >> great courage, to wait until all members have already spoken and then stand up and wrap your arms around procedure. we see it in the united states' senate every day where members say we want amendments, we want debate, but we're still a no. and then we stand
president and the u.s. secretary of state gets ready to say i do at a pricey affair. first tonight, a sign that congressman charlie rangel could face a relatively light penalty if he is eventually found guilty of ethics violations. today one of the lawmakers on the rangle investigation panel said he and his colleagues have recommended a reprimand. that's basically when the house votes to express displeasure with the lawmaker's actions. it's the mildest form of official punishment and it would only come if congressman rangle's fellow lawmakers find him guilty in a trial this fall. you will recall rangle is accused of 13 ethics violations, including failing to report rental income and accepting favors from donors. rangle maintains he hasn't done anything wrong but just hours ago, word that more democrats are now calling on the congressman to resign. molly henneberg with the news live on capitol hill. molly, it seems the congressman's support is eroding a bit. >> jon, five house democrats have now come forward and said they think congressman rangle should resign. the latest is john from kentu
is on hold. now allegations of u.s. war crimes from the man who first published the documents online. t.j. winick has the latest now from washington. good morning, t.j. >> reporter: good morning, rob and vinita. the documents come to light at a time when the public and congress have some serious doubts about the war. it is being called one of the biggest intelligence breaches in u.s. history. 92,000 leaked reports, six years of classified records, depicting details about missions gone horribly wrong, civilian deaths, and being double-crossed by our alleged ally the pakistani government. >> it poses a very real and potential threat to those that are working hard every day to keep us safe. >> reporter: the u.s. gives more than $1 billion annually to pakistan to help fight terrorism. but there are 180 dispatches, some offering strong detail that pakistan's military intelligence agency, the isi, is helping the afghan insurgency attack american troops. >> i'm looking forward to my meeting with the defense minister. we have a lot to talk about. >> reporter: secretary of state clinton dodged a
polanski will be extradited to the u.s. to face child sex charges. polanski pleaded guilty to having sex with a 13-year-old girl back in 1977. he then fled to europe before sentencing. we are expected to learn more about this decision in about two hours. we'll bring that to you live right here on the most news in the morning. >>> the white house this morning promising the terrorist behind the "deplorable and cowardly attacks" in euganda will be tracked down and brought to justice. at least 64 people were killed including one american. six americans from a church mission were also injured. joining me on the phone right now, cnn national security contributor fran townsend. fran was the homeland security advisor to president bush and is now a member of the cia's external advisory board. we're talking about these crowded venues. people gathered to watch the world cup of course finals, one was a restaurant there, a popular restaurant. do we know who could have been the target of these blasts? >> that's the ultimate question. i think when you see the white house statement that you referred to,
with the blood of americans. let me explain. july is officially the deadliest month for u.s. forces in nine long years of the war with 66 americans killed. the danger and the volatility aren't limited to the battle field. there are scores of people who riot in the afghan capital today after a vehicle carrying four u.s. contractors was involved in an accident with a car carrying four afghans. our cnn reporter ness kabul. >> reporter: around 3:00 p.m. friday afternoon and here in the capital of kabul, on airport road, this road is called airport road, two american vehicles were driving when one hit a civilian vehicle in the end killing two adults, one man, one woman, and injuring four others. this is the remains of the first car. this is apparently the car that actually hit the civilian vehicle. if you notice they were trying to leave after being attacked by other civilians in the area. while they tried to leave their car got stuck here on this side of the curb. and if we walk here we can show you the rocks thrown by the afghans in the area who saw everything happen. it was an angry mob. over a th
be in the works between the united states and russia. kate amara joins us live with the story. >> russian and u.s. officials will not confirm any spy swap. family members and attorneys say this is going to happen. in arraignment for 10 accused russian spies. their cases have been combined. a single indictment against the defendants. this feels an impending spy swap. >> this is a law enforcement matter that is being handled that way and i refer you to the department of justice. >> more evidence of a possible secret agent exchange. a meeting between the russian ambassador and a senior u.s. diplomat. >> did the spy case come up? likely it did. am i going to get into details? nope. i will refer you to the justice department. >> intelligence officials say there might be more foreign spies in this country than we think. >> we have serious counter intelligence issues that would have to deal with. >> only 10 of these suspects are expected in court today. the 11th jumped bail in cyprus. kate amara, wbal-tv 11 news. >> can you go into more detail about why moving all the cases to man and is a sign of a pos
advisor to former four star general and u.s. secretary of state colin powell, is telling the white house we cannot win. caroline shivley live in washington with more on that. hi, caroline and welcome back to you, congratulations on your baby! beautiful baby. what is secretary clinton's agenda in pakistan. >> reporter: she is stressing the u.s. needs pakistan to help win the war in afghanistan. to help get them on board, secretary clinton will also announce billions of dollars the u.s. will be funneling to pakistan for water and energy projects, part of the $7.5 billion that we already knew would be spread out over five years. on the plane over to islamabad, richard holbrooke's deputy said the cooperation is not going to happen overnight and here's the quote: we will not be able to get them aligned over a one-year time period on every issue and change 30 years of foreign policy of pakistan on a dime. the administration says they are making progress, critics say, for a billion-and-a-half dollars a year you better be. jamie? >> jamie: well, all of the money that is going to pakistan, i know
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